Sunday, November 10, 2013

Memorandum for Fellow Armed Forces Members



MEMORANDUM FOR FELLOW ARMED FORCES MEMBERS

Subject:         An honorable remembrance on our designated day

1.    As we approach the dawn of a day to remember all veterans tomorrow, I hope you will join me in pausing for a moment to honor all our fallen team mates. I am sure you were close to one or more soldiers who are not here with us today, just as I am. Time can pass, but I can still recall the faces, the conversations, the sleepless nights and long days together in the field. I miss my fellow soldiers, those friends meant very much to me. They are resting in a better place, but they are never forgotten as long as we keep their memories in our hearts and minds.

2.    November 11, observed in the United States in honor of veterans of the armed services and in commemoration of the armistice that ended World War I in 1918. In 1954 it was renamed from Armistice Day and given the added significance of honoring veterans.


3.    We serve in the armed services, we raise our right hand and swear on our honor with our life to protect and defend the constitution of the United States. We take an oath, the most sacred promise of all. At the time of enlistment or reenlistment a soldier states ….. I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.

4.    The Army officer’s oath states …..I, (your name), having been appointed a (rank) in the United States Army, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter. So help me God.

5.    In the army of the old Austro-Hungarian Empire, the emperor or empress had a medal that was awarded to officers who, by disobeying orders, turned the tide and won important battles. In the US Military, of course, there is no such medal; this sort of judgment, wrapped within a full, disciplined understanding of the legal and moral impact of decisions, is expected.

6.    Let each of us spend a few moments tomorrow remembering the pride we felt as we proudly serve in our armed forces. No one, and nothing, can ever take that away from us. As we age beyond the time of our service, we can see that camaraderie cross service boundaries, binding together Marines and Army, Navy, Coast Guard and Air Force alike. Let us NEVER forget, we are all in this together!

FOR THE COMMANDER:



                                                                                Richard S. Riley
                                                                                CPT, MSC
                                                                                US ARMY - IRR

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